Disney's Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day Begins Production | Divine Lifestyle
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Disney’s Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day Begins Production

Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day

Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day begins production. This popular kid's book is now being turned into a movie by Disney that looks like it will be a great family friendly flick to see when it hits theaters October 10, 2014. This movie is going to be completely filmed in the Los Angles area if you are in or around there you might get a peek at the filming of this movie. The movie is too early into production for me to share any pictures of the filming process with you, but keep an eye out for them.

Disney’s “Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day” follows the exploits of 11-year-old Alexander as he experiences the most terrible and horrible day of his young life—a day that begins with gum stuck in his hair, followed by one calamity after another. But when Alexander tells his upbeat family about the misadventures of his disastrous day, he finds little sympathy and begins to wonder if bad things only happen to him. He soon learns that he’s not alone when his brother, sister, mom and dad all find themselves living through their own terrible, horrible, no good, very bad day. Anyone who says there is no such thing as a bad day just hasn't had one.

They have locked in some amazing actors for the characters in this movie! Steve Carell and Jenifer Garner will be playing Alexander's parents and they cast 12-year-old Australian native Ed Oxenbould, who makes his big-screen feature debut as the film’s title character, Alexander.


Photo Credit: Catalogs.com

Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day published in 1972, was written by Judith Viorst and illustrated by Ray Cruz. The endearing, enduring classic (with more than 2 million copies in print) became an ALA Notable Children’s Book while also winning a George G. Stone Center Recognition of Merit, a Georgia Children’s Book Award, and distinction as a Reading Rainbow book. Viorst followed this book (inspired by her own three sons’ childhoods—Alexander, Anthony and Nicholas) with two sequels: “Alexander, Who Used to be Rich Last Sunday” (1978) and “Alexander, Who's Not (Do You Hear Me? I Mean It!) Going to Move” (1995). The 1972 original was first adapted to the small screen as a half-hour HBO animated musical in 1990 before Viorst collaborated with composers Charles Strouse (music) and Shelley Markham (musical score) for a 1998 stage musical at the Kennedy Center in Washington, D.C.

 

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