Blueberry Puff Pastry Peaches
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Peach Blueberry Puff Pastry

Peach Blueberry Puff Pastry

Living in Georgia, we get to pick peaches and blueberries every single year. I love coming up with new ideas on what we can do with all of this fruit besides just eating it outright. I love peaches and blueberries so much that it's like a game coming up with new recipes. I'm also a big fan of all things puff pastry.  Below is a recipe for this crusty, flaky, and packed full of fruit pastry. It's amazing. We hope that this Peach Blueberry Puff Pastry post inspires you. 

Peach Blueberry Puff Pastry

Peach Blueberry Puff Pastry

Peach Blueberry Puff Pastry

Peach Blueberry Puff Pastry

Peach Blueberry Puff Pastry

Serves 6

Ingredients

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Peach Blueberry Puff Pastry

Directions

  1. Place flour and cold-sliced butter into a mixing bowl. Using a pastry cutter, cut the butter into the flour until the mixture is the size of small peas.
  2. Add cottage cheese and mix with a spoon until combined. Using your hands, shape it into a ball.
  3. Cover the dough with plastic wrap and chill for 1 hour.
  4. Preheat oven to 375 degrees.
  5. Place peaches and blueberries in a large bowl. Add ¼ cup brown sugar, cornstarch, and almond extract. Gently toss to coat the fruit. Set aside.
  6. Roll dough to a 12-inch circle on a piece of flour-dusted parchment paper. Leave the dough on the parchment paper and transfer to a baking sheet.
  7. Spoon fruit mixture onto dough circle, and spread toward edges, leaving about 2-inches all around without fruit.
  8. Fold dough edges over, crimping and pleating edges as needed all around.
  9. Brush the beaten egg over the crust edges and sprinkle with 1 1-tbsp. brown sugar.
  10. Bake on the center rack of the preheated oven for about 45 minutes or until browned.
  11. Remove the galette from the oven and place onto a cooling rack. Cool for at least 20 minutes before slicing and serving.

Blueberry Peach Galette

Ingredients:

  • 2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1 cup butter cold, cut into small slices about ⅛ inch thick
  • 1 cup small curd cottage cheese
  • ½ tsp almond extract
  • ¼ cup light brown sugar
  • 1 tbsp light brown sugar
  • 3 med peaches sliced med-thin (peel or leave the skin on)
  • 1 pint fresh blueberries
  • 1 tbsp corn starch
  • 1 lg egg beaten

Directions:

  1. Place flour and cold sliced butter into a mixing bowl. Using a pastry cutter, cut the butter into the flour until the mixture is the size of small peas.
  2. Add cottage cheese and mix with a spoon until combined. Using your hands, shape into a ball.
  3. Cover dough with plastic wrap and chill for 1 hour.
  4. Preheat oven to 375 degrees.
  5. Place peaches and blueberries in a large bowl. Add ¼ cup brown sugar, cornstarch, and almond extract. Gently toss to coat the fruit. Set aside.
  6. Roll dough to a 12-inch circle on a piece of flour-dusted parchment paper. Leave the dough on the parchment paper and transfer to a baking sheet.
  7. Spoon fruit mixture onto dough circle, and spread toward edges, leaving about 2-inches all around without fruit.
  8. Fold dough edges over, crimping and pleating edges as needed all around.
  9. Brush the beaten egg over crust edges and sprinkle with the 1-tbsp. brown sugar.
  10. Bake on center rack of the preheated oven for about 45 minutes or until browned.
  11. Remove galette from oven and place onto a cooling rack. Cool at least 20 minutes before slicing and serving.

Peach Blueberry Puff Pastry

Peach and Blueberry Galette

A Peach and Blueberry Galette is what we have here but most people haven't heard the word galette before. The word “galette” comes from the Norman word “gale,” simply meaning “flat cake.” It's a versatile term in French cuisine, encompassing a variety of savory and sweet treats. Below is a glimpse into the history of this delightful pastry.

Early Beginnings

  • 14th-15th Centuries: The earliest mention of “galette” likely refers to the Breton galette, a savory pancake made with buckwheat flour. Buckwheat thrived in the region's poor soil, making it a staple food for centuries. These galettes were often filled with simple ingredients like cheese, ham, and eggs.
  • 15th Century: The galette des Rois (King cake) emerges as a festive treat enjoyed on Epiphany (January 6th). This flaky pastry, typically filled with frangipane (almond cream), hides a bean or charm inside. Whoever finds it becomes “king” for the day, a tradition that continues to bring joy to families across France.

Evolution and Diversification

  • 17th-18th Centuries: Sweet galettes gain popularity, often filled with fruits like apples, pears, and berries. The rise of sugar cultivation and refined baking techniques paves the way for more elaborate creations.
  • 19th-20th Centuries: Regional variations flourish. In the south of France, a brioche-style galette des Rois has become popular, while savory galettes in Brittany incorporate seafood and vegetables.

Peach Blueberry Puff Pastry

Modern Galette

Today, galettes remain a beloved part of French cuisine, enjoyed in both homes and bakeries. They come in various sizes and flavors, from individual galettes to large ones meant for sharing. Savory options like tomato and goat cheese or caramelized onion and bacon are increasingly popular.

Beyond France

The galette has also found fans beyond French borders. In the United States, versions like the King Cake of New Orleans and the galette saucisson of Quebec showcase the pastry's adaptability.

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Interesting Facts about the Galette

  • The tradition of hiding a bean in the galette des Rois dates back to Roman times, where it symbolized Saturnalia, a festival celebrating the reversal of social roles.
  • In some parts of France, the person who finds the bean has to buy the next galette!
  • The Breton galette is so thin and crispy that it can be shattered with a single bite.

Peach Blueberry Puff Pastry

If you are looking for peach galette recipes or just want the best peach galette recipe ever, our fresh peach galette with blueberries is a top recipe in this family. We hope that you are inspired by this Peach Blueberry Puff Pastry. Happy baking!

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